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When is it Okay to Tell a Patient ‘No’?

When is it Okay to Tell a Patient ‘No’?

Dr. Vercler’s presentation went over a lot of very interesting and deep topics on ethics. Should a doctor be allowed to say no? I think that in some circumstances and on a base-to-base case, a doctor/physician should be able to say ‘no’ to their patients. I’m sure some of you disagree with me but sometimes people want excessive surgeries or procedures, or want to make a decision that is not in their best interest. However, I do think that when telling a patient no, the doctor needs to explain why he/she is being denied certain care, and that this denial of care is being based on medical facts and what the doctor thinks would be best.

My father has a number of joint and bone issues due to being hit by a car before my birth, he continuously has to receive treatment via procedures and surgeries so that he can live his life to the fullest. He actually had another shoulder procedure at the University hospital last month. There is a procedure that can be done to take care of a vast majority of his neck and back pain, but that said this procedure has a higher risk rate and does not guarantee his ability to be pain free. As a result, physicians have told him that it is in his best interest to not have the procedure done, at least not until he is much older and is aware of the risks and possible benefits. In this case, my father’s best interest has been put first rather than choosing a producer than may ultimately hurt him more than help him. Some of you may think, ‘He’s crazy not to receive the care, he might be so much better off!’ but the reality is, he’s playing it much safer without having the procedure done. His denial of treatment is being substituted with smaller and safer procedures that can be done to help improve his quality of life.

My father was denied care but for the right reasons. The doctors, rather than lead him on with false hope, educated him on the procedure, the facts behind their decision, and an alternative that works just as well without all the risk. I think that although he has to have more than one procedure done, he does not have to worry about it all going wrong in one, risky, procedure.

In my book, sometimes you have a right to tell a patient ‘no’, and it works out for the better. The patient isn’t always going to make the right decision and it is the physicians job to lead them down a path of life and vitality, even if that means telling them ‘no’.

Just the Beginning of Something Great

Just the Beginning of Something Great

Over the course of my first semester at Michigan, I have grown so much more than I could have ever imagined. I went to my interviews and nailed them, got a job and a promotion at work within just a few months. I successfully introduced myself to the head of the Athletic Training program and received permission to take those courses. What I’m most proud of, is coming into an entirely new environment and being able to integrate well, make lots of great friends, and being part of a school that creates such an incredible and friendly atmosphere. Next semester the workload for me is going to be much heavier and I’m going to have more shifts at work due to being a coordinator, but I’m actually excited to be challenged! One of the reasons I love it here so much is that I’m pushed to work hard and take charge of my life, something that is going to seriously benefit me down the road. I’m going to enjoy my winter break, but I’ll also be preparing to tackle this next semester head on. Upon reading my letter, the one thing that stuck out to me was the fact that I had not made and really good friends yet and I was anxious about what the future held for me socially. Now I look at the friend group in front of me, all the memories we’ve already made, and knowing that these are going to be the friendships that last a lifetime. Overall, I have to say that this has been a pretty fantastic semester, and I’m looking forward to many more ahead of me!

Trump v. Hilary: Who knows health care?

Trump v. Hilary: Who knows health care?

This election has come down to two, polar opposite, candidates. Both seem to vehemently attack each other in a battle of wits, without really describing their own policies and views. This weeks lecture really allowed me to see what both candidates have to offer in terms of health care.

First lets look at Hilary’s plan for the future of U.S. health care. She hopes to keep the ACA in place, while expanding some of it where applicable. A big point in her plan is to make a “public option” available. She is going to push for lower health care costs, especially when it comes to prescription drugs, copays, and deductibles. She also wants to expand access of healthcare for those incapable of affording rising costs. Lastly she is really pushing for more funding for community health centers to boost the availability and quality of primary care services. These are all great things to strive for but personally I feel like they’re a bit unreasonable. First, opening foreign drug companies to sell their products in the U.S. is not as easy as it sounds. The FDA takes quite a while to do full reports on products, for example, the FDA still has took multiple years come out with a formal report on E-cigarettes or Vape pens, think how long it will take drugs to get approved, the standards of other countries differ greatly from ours. Also I feel like that once drugs are allowed to be sold within the U.S., it will drive U.S. based drug companies to compete and possibly lose profits against lower priced foreign drugs. The major issue and weakness of her plan is regarding the sustainability. She wants to increase funding in some areas while providing free care in others. How will her plan sustain itself and how long will it last a system where funds are going to spent more than created? I understand she plans to raise taxes, but will that be enough? Healthcare isn’t going to be the only place tax money is going to used, if anything it’s just a small part. Hilary has some great plans for this country but how will she follow through with it, and seeing the ACA already starting to have some issues (i.e. the rise in health care costs this coming year, drastic increase), will she be able to keep her plan afloat?

Now on to Mr. Trump and his plan for health care. The biggest part of his plan is the fact that he plans to completely repeal the ACA. Also he wants to allow insurance companies to pay across state lines to increase competition. He is also am avid supporter of having people get HSA’s, especially younger, healthy, people. Like Hilary, he wants price transparency so consumers can “shop around” for the best deal. Also similar to Hilary, he wants to allow the import of foreign drugs to drive competition up. Trump, however, does not want to give healthcare to immigrants. Regarding medicaid, he would block-grant medicaid for each state as he feels each states knows their people best. Trump has a much weaker plan in the sense that it really isn’t a fully formed package. Not to say he wouldn’t have a better game plan later on, but currently this is more a skeleton plan than anything, so there is not as much to work with compared to Hilary. He shares some similar ideas with her, like opening the export of drugs and price transparency. The price transparency is something I can agree with, as some insurance companies will charge much more for the same procedure than others and consumers should be able to weigh their options. When it comes to the complete dissolution of the ACA (please be aware this is my opinion) I see that as a strength. The current ACA tried to accomplish too much in such a short period of time. People want things as quick as possible in today’s society and the ACA promised so much but is becoming a bigger problem than solution. It has some good parts that I seriously think are awesome, but as a whole it cannot function. By dissolving the ACA we would have the opportunity to take it slow and work on things piece by piece, not rush into something problematic. However I think his ideas on open drug import is a weakness for the same reason as stated with Hilary. The weakness of his plan overall is the fact that it centers completely around getting rid of the ACA, but what happens after that? He really hasn’t created a major plan to replace it. Trump is using shock and awe by talking about removing the ACA but really does not talk about where we go from there, and for that reason I really question what health care would really look like under him.

Which candidate has the better plan for the future of American Health care? Is one plan completely perfect, without flaw? What is something that these plans are missing in your opinion?