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Author: RobCard100

Year One: A Reflection

Year One: A Reflection

While my first year at the University of Michigan was great, there was still challenges I had to face along the way. Some challenges were social, some academic, and some related to mental health. For me, the greatest challenge was to balance school work, the activities of daily living, and extracurricular activities. This is not like high school, where it is a lot easier to balance all of these activities by using time management. The same thing applies to college, but you have to work smarter in order to maintain good grades and have a fulfillingĀ college experience. It’s a skill that’s very important to learn and difficult to master. Although I believe to have gotten better at managing my time, I still need more time and practice to get better at it. Procrastination is a normal thing to do, but I personally free as if I do too much of it.

Unnatural Causes

Unnatural Causes

The video that we saw in class this week was not very surprising because it’s obvious that lower socioeconomic status will result in fewer resources. That means less money to buy healthy food and to purchase living quarters in an area that has less crime, fewer environment health hazards, and a better neighborhood. The result of these inequalities comes in the form of higher rates of obesity, asthma, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and a slew of other negative health problems. Life expectancy is cut short, as shown by the graphics in the video. This makes me wonder: how much of a person’s health is about their life choices and how much is due to their environment? No one is raised in a vacuum, but we can’t blame society entirely for people’s shortcomings. It’s a lot easier to be healthier in high socioeconomic status, so that presents another question: What can we do to reduce the incidence of negative health problems in lower-income communities? We could have initiatives to grow gardens to provide fresh vegetables in communities, make huge efforts to reduce crime (which would reduce stress levels), clean up the environment so how. What are your thoughts?

Semester Reflection

Semester Reflection

My first semester at the University of Michigan has been wonderful. I’ve met a lot of great people, taken part in many great activities, and I’ve learned a lot in my Nursing classes. In the beginning, I was worried about how my classes would go, and if my social life would improve. These worries are outlined in my letter, and stand out above anything else. I can say with confidence that there was nothing to worry about in both of those areas. From elementary to high school, stress was a huge concern in my life. As time went on, I realized that I don’t need to worry so much about my academic performance, and I learned multiple ways to manage stress. I also learned how to manage my time better, a skill I hope to continue honing. Professionally, I learned how to dress up for professional autobiographies and formals. Furthermore, I had to accept the consequences of missing important dates (an observation). I’m most proud of how much I matured both physically and emotionally. I’m now more responsible than I was before, although I still made mistakes. For next semester and beyond, I really need to remember important dates better and not them. Also, I slacked a little much and should do a better job of allocating free time.

Week 11: Social Determinants of Health

Week 11: Social Determinants of Health

I grew up in an upper-middle-class family in the city of Ann Arbor. There was always good-quality food on the table and regular visits to healthcare providers. I’ve been healthy my entire life, with very few incidents of bad health. Since I lived in a suburban area, the air was clean, so I never acquired a respiratory disorder. My family also encouraged my brothers and I to do sports and exercise regularly. Therefore, my socioeconomic status and family upbringingĀ didn’t harm my health. My other identities also haven’t harmed my health either. I’m a white, heterosexual, cisgender male, so I’m not negatively affected by the health situations and outcomes associated with race, gender, sex, or sexuality. To be honest, none of my identities have hurt my health in any way. Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t me gloating or trying to sound elitist. I’m extremely grateful for the situation I was born into and continue to live in.