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Author: rhardyni

Embrace Uncertainty

Embrace Uncertainty

If I could travel back to the beginning of my freshman year I would tell myself to embrace uncertainty. When I first came to college, I thought I knew exactly what I wanted to do and exactly how I wanted to get there. Over the course of the first semester I slowly realized that the path was going to change. At first, I was not open to the idea of changing my major and doing something that was not science related. However, I was still not sure exactly what I wanted to study and which “path” I should go down. As a result, I stressed a lot over what classes I was supposed to be taking and how I was going to fit these classes in.

After countless hours of thinking about my future and stressing about what I was doing, I came to the conclusion that sometimes you just have to embrace uncertainty. Constantly stressing and worrying was not going to help me get through my first year of college. What I realized would help me was just going with the flow and taking classes that were going to help me learn. Accepting this manta in the past few months has allowed me to grow as a student and individual, and I wish I would have thought about school this way sooner. Yes, it is important for me to figure out what major I want to do and what career I want to do, but it is important for me to allow myself to have some wiggle room to take different classes and learn as much as I can for the time being.

Medical Decisions

Medical Decisions

I believe that a patient always has the right to receive any treatment they want done as long as the healthcare provider feels comfortable giving the care. A patient has the right to decide what they want to do with their body and how they want to proceed with their care. I feel that there are certain cases however, where a healthcare professional can choose to not treat a patient. This would be if a provider is uncomfortable performing the procedure and concerned about the potential well being of the patient. In this situation, the healthcare provider should refer the patient to someone who is able to provide the care they want. There is a great possibility that there will be a provider out there that is willing to treat the patient and is comfortable doing it. Another situation where the healthcare provider could refuse to give treatment is where the patient is not in the right state of mind or capable to make decisions on their health. The provider should be able to refuse as well if those advocating for that persons health are not around or uninformed. A doctor or other provider should not be able to refuse treatment in any other situations as it is their duty to provide their patients with care that the patient so desires.

I major aspect of healthcare is allowing the patient to have autonomy in their care. If doctors were able to refuse treatment to patients, personal autonomy would be lost. It is important that we keep a line between the relationship of healthcare providers and patients to ensure that the healthcare providers are not gaining too much power over their patients wishes. My question to you all is, what are other scenarios where a healthcare provider can refuse to treat a patient, and how should those situations be handled?

End of Semester Reflection

End of Semester Reflection

Over the course of the semester I learned how to not be so stressed. I’m sure this sounds crazy being in college, but I have found that it is possible. I was a stress case in high school and found that its not really the best life style. So often we stress out, do not get enough sleep, eat junk, and end up feeling awful. I found that if I take time to relax, I do better. When I stress over exams I do poorly. If I give myself time and just breathe, and actually get 8 hours of sleep, the results are great. This has not always been the easiest task over the semester (thank you bio), but I have made the effort to make it work. That is something I am proud of myself for because it is a change for the better. I hope that I can continue to have a more relax mindset in the next semester and do better.

I guess I have never really thought about who I am as a professional. However, if I had to say how I have changed it would be to always make a good first impression. The professional autobiographies and observations have thought me this. When you dress nice and take the time to be put together it really shows that you care. As a professional, you should always strive to be that. So, thanks to HSSP, I have somewhat grown in a professional manner.

In my letter to myself I wrote a lot of goals. These included get good grades, eat healthy, be less stressed. As stated before, I accomplished at least one of these goals. I also learned something from my goals. In college, grades are not everything, yes also a crazy statement. I had a teacher in high school who use to always tell me,  “Knowing and learning the material is more important, and the grades will follow.” I never really enforced that statement into my life until college. This semester has been a battle over truly understanding the material that is put in front of you and being able to apply it. This is hard and sometimes that grades aren’t what you want. But this lesson has really taught be how to try, and really try, not just get by. I hope I can learn from this and continue one with this for the rest of college, not just next semester.

Global Health

Global Health

I always knew that health care in some countries was far from the advanced health care we have here in the United States. However, it surprised me that so many women in Ghana were suffering from breast cancer and were not receiving proper care. Culture plays such a large role in how women receive their care, and that is something that must be considered. In Ghana faith healers are more popular than actual physicians. This is due to a fear of western medicine. I began to wonder why they were afraid. Is it due to the way that American’s impose themselves on other countries? Or reasons related to the wants and features of their culture? When we spoke about things we need to consider when walking into other communities, it really opened my eyes. So often we think were doing the right thing and what others want, but that may not always be the case. It is great that the United States wants to be helpful, but we need to be mindful of other cultures and customs before we get there. It seems that when this is accomplished, we can be the most impactful.

I also found it extremely upsetting that workers in the Peace and Love Hospital were lying to patients about having cancer and giving them unnecessary medication. Even in the United States we have seen cases were doctors have lied to patients about having cancer, and giving them chemotherapy drugs that caused more harm than good. I think this correlation is an important one to make because it shows that health care is not perfect anywhere, and is not always used for the peoples best interest.

My question to others is:

Do you believe that it is the United States responsibility to go into others health care systems and try to implement change? Or should the United States prevent from imposing and allow these cultures to carry on their health care systems in a way that they are comfortable?