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Author: owenmill

I Respectfully Disagree

I Respectfully Disagree

The first thing I always heard when I told people here that I was undecided was, “That’s ok, you have plenty of time.” Maybe they were just trying to be nice or trying to make me feel less worried but at the end of my freshman year I would like to go back and tell every one of them, “I disagree.” Most of all, I would like to get up real close in the face of young me and yell, “Decide!” Over and over again until I made a decision on a major. Why would I do that? Because I feel like I wasted so much time, effort, and money on classes I did not even want to be in. I was told it would be different when I get to college. I get to pick my classes, I get to choose the ones that interest me. However, in first semester and second semester I took Calculus and Biology, neither of which really interested me and both had intensive workloads. While it is probably good to have a basic knowledge of Biology and Calculus, I would rather had been doing something that would count toward a major that interests me such as Intro to International Studies. There are just far too many potential majors for me to spend time exploring at University of Michigan. I needed to just make a decision, stop wasting time, and start working on my major. Once I have a good amount of credits in my major out of the way, then it makes sense to take classes such as Biology and Calculus to get a basic knowledge of these subjects. However, I would rather feel safer knowing my major, than being as undecided as I am now. To all the incoming freshman, I would advise them to start having some ideas as to what they want to do. And to all the people who say it is ok for me to not know what I want to major in, I say, I respectfully disagree.

Chronic Stressors

Chronic Stressors

On top of all of the stressors mentioned in the movie, other times where the release of cortisol is initiated can include credit card debt, student loan debt, having to worry about clean water, and worrying about your children’s education.

Have you ever seen those commercials for those anti-depressants of a man/woman walking around with a stormy cloud over their head while the rest of the world around them is glimmering and sunny? This is what it is like for people with credit card debt. The thought of their financial issues hangs like a dark cloud over people’s heads making even the brightest of days darker. The same goes for student loan debt. No matter what a person is trying to do, their is always that ache in the back of their mind that they are thousands of dollars in debt. Unfortunately, high interest rates help to create and reinforce these debt stressors which means people are stuck with their debt for decades.

Worry that stems from issues of dirty water and poor education for one’s kids can also lead to chronic stress and mostly only affect the poorer class of people. Availability to clean water and good education comes from living in wealthier neighborhoods and unfortunately many poorer neighborhoods must purchase expensive water filters or take long transportation rides in order to get to good schools.

Other worries stemmed from racism can create chronic stress. In particular, predominantly African-American or Muslim neighborhoods must worry about the threat of police violence simply for the reason of these people’s ethnicities. This can lead to high amounts of stress when someone is simply walking down the streets everyday.

These are just some stressors that occur in poorer class citizens lives. Can any of you name anymore? How can we fix these inequities?

End of Term Reflection

End of Term Reflection

College has been a life-changing experience for me. I have progressed in many ways both personally and professionally. First, I think I have grown as a writer in the last four months because reading back through this letter, not only was my handwriting horrible, but it also had poor grammar and just generally substandard style. I have also changed my personal goals. I no longer desire a lot of money to consider myself successful. All I really would like is enough money to buy a lighthouse in a bay in Northern Maine and retire there quietly and alone with a sailboat and a fishing rod. With regards to my professional goals, I have become more undecided on a career than I was before I came to the university and took the UC course. HSSP and the UC course have given me a lot to consider and I will surely have to keep on searching within myself to find what I want to do. In my letter, I had narrowed my choices down to only a few and I was no longer sure about the health field. However, now I am reviewing my choices and once again considering the health field as an option. I am definitely most proud that I am no longer as materialistic as I once was. It is childish, foolish, and just plain silly to chase money all my life and I have a more complete goal now. Overall, I have completed a proud metamorphosis from a money-grubbing caterpillar to a beautiful butterfly in college.

LGBTQ Health Disparities

LGBTQ Health Disparities

Health disparities in the LGBTQ community is not a topic that we hear about in everyday discussions, mainstream media sources, or typical classrooms. Thus, there was quite a bit of new knowledge that I gained from this lecture and almost all of it was surprising. However, if I had to choose one surprising thing from this lecture, it would have to be the story about the medical professionals who quite severely misdiagnosed the transgender male African-American on the basis of objective bias against him. It was shocking to me that a professional of any type, especially in the medical field which is supposed to be the smartest and most compassionate field of work, could have such a discrepancy in their service. What are some possible solutions to eliminating those biases in medical professionals?

Are those biases the reason it has been so difficult to improve LGBTQ health? In my opinion, biases seem like the most logical mountain that the LGBTQ community has had to climb to improve their healthcare, and they are still only on the headwall approaching the summit. The roots of this perspective issue derives mostly from the issue of the history of discrimination against the LGBTQ community in healthcare and false information that damaged the LGBTQ population. The effects of this damage is still evident among the LGBTQ community today and is the most substantiated argument for why LGBTQ health has been so hard to improve.