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Author: monnad

Freshman Year Experience

Freshman Year Experience

If I could go back to the beginning of the year and tell myself something, I would tell myself:

1st. Just don’t stress out so much! It won’t end up helping your doomed Gen-Chem grade, and only served to give you stress breakouts and made you even less productive!

2nd. Oh gosh procrastination… It’s just not good for anything. You really have to finish that project sometime not the night before, and although it may seem nice when you’re procrastinating and watching Netflix, cramming all the work into the night before just isn’t going to work out well.

3rd. Join more extra curricular activities! You focused a lot on your academics this year and I’m proud of you, but it would have been nice to do more in the realm of activities and social events! Maybe that’ll be a good goal for next year!

4th. Lastly, don’t eat that 10th mojo cookie, just don’t… I know I know, they’re just so melty and gooey and irresistible, but your body will seriously thank you… That Freshman 15 is going to hit hard even without you even realizing, so better just to cut down on the stress eating from the get go!

But in all honesty, I had a great freshman year that I wouldn’t trade for anything. I loved being a part of the HSSP community, and made some great friends and connections in my year here. I hope that my entire undergrad experience can be just as positive!

How to do no harm?

How to do no harm?

I think that in many cases, people who may have “good” intentions initially can end up causing great harm to a lot of people at least partly due to societal norms and influences of the times. For example, with the Nazi doctors’ experiments, in their minds they may think that they were actually doing something good for their nation’s soldiers’ survival. This may have justified to them the merits of conducting all the inhumane and awful experiments. Also, with the compulsory sterilization in Canada, they justified their actions by citing the possibility of “improving” their nation’s gene pool. In any case, I believe that these people’s actions could have at least been partly influenced by societal beliefs of the times.

As someone who hopes to one day become a healthcare provider and interact with patients on a daily basis, I will make sure that I look at each patient as an individual. I think that in many instances it becomes easy for doctors to consider each patient as simply another case instead of a person. This then could make it easier for them to then disregard ethical concerns in treating patients. It is extremely important for us to discuss the issue of ethics and morality, but also to learn about instances in history where healthcare providers and governments have failed to uphold these standards. We must learn about what is right, but also about what happens when things go wrong. We must learn from our mistakes in order for progress to happen.

 

 

End of Term Reflection

End of Term Reflection

Its hard to believe that my first semester of college is drawing to a close! I honestly didn’t think at times that I would make it through. Now that I’m pretty much finished with this semester, I can reflect on how I’ve grown as a professional and as a person.

In the letter to myself, I talked about some fears I have about college. One of my biggest issues is bad time management and procrastination. While I can’t honestly say I didn’t do any of that this semester, I do feel proud that I was able to develop a schedule for myself, and finish assignments and studying in a timely manner. I also had a goal in the letter of becoming more outgoing, and I can confidently say that my time as a member of HSSP has really helped me come out of my shell, and I have meet so many awesome people that I would like to remain friends with.

Professionally, I really enjoyed being able to observe in palliative care. Although I’ve had experiences observing/shadowing healthcare professionals in the past, this community was the first time I really got exposed to the idea of death and dying, and how the healthcare system plays a role in that. I think that my experiences this year really helped me grow as a future healthcare professional, as I got to experience a side of healthcare that has always been present in our lives, but I had never sought to understand before.

Week 11- Social Determinants of Health

Week 11- Social Determinants of Health

Growing up as a kid from a middle class family in the city of Ann Arbor, I really didn’t understand the privileged nature 0f my upbringing. With my mom having health insurance through working at the university, healthcare was always readily available to me growing up. My identity of being relatively privileged in my childhood had a positive impact on on my health in the sense that attaining healthcare was never really an issue for me. I can’t really think of any negative impact my identities have had on me, but I have experienced negative impacts by identity through experiences in healthcare with my parents.

My personal identities have had mainly positive impacts on my health, but the same can not be said for my parents. As they are first generation immigrants and are not fluent in English, It is difficult for them to communicate with healthcare providers at times. The availability of translators does help, but there still seems to be a gap in their communication and connection with their physicians. My hope is that one day to aid in bridging this gap between physician and patients from different cultures/ languages. With my identity of being bilingual, and my first hand experiences dealing with the inequities of the healthcare system when it comes to serving minority patients, I hope to have a positive impact on healthcare for such groups.

Now I ask you, what impacts have any of your identities had on your health? What would you change about the healthcare system today to remedy the inequities in healthcare?