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Author: apvyas

What I should Have Known

What I should Have Known

My freshman year in college has been a tumultuous but entertaining one. My time here at Michigan has been filled with memories,  friends, and experiences that will help me develop for the time incoming. However, in spite of that, there were many challenges and hard realities that I had to face on a personal and mental note. As a part of the College of Engineering, my academic and personal interests often conflicted with the interests of my parents and my desires. Coming in to HSSP, I was debating whether or not a career in the healthcare field was for me. As i delved deeper and deeper into the year, I realized that my pre-medicine intentions were not my true calling. I wish I could tell myself earlier that it is ok to not be ok. In your life, it is ok to not be sure about your life intentions and be able to be satisfied with that. Often I thought that I had to be sure of my intentions, especially with those in HSSP and their desires to be in the healthcare field. Through the classes, clubs, and experiences I am now content with my career choice in Chemical Engineering and Computer Science.

At the beginning of my freshman year, I wish I had told myself that you just have to be yourself and learn to live. Through high school, learning was all about memorization and practicing the skill. Through my engineering classes, learning has become more of a skill than a repetition. I have become more content with being less competitive with my grades and actually being satisfied with what I have done. I am glad that I now know these things and can use them to be a better person ,student, and human being.

Change, Policy, and the Long Road Ahead

Change, Policy, and the Long Road Ahead

A prominent medical professional at Stanford once said “Pay attention to what makes you angry. That’s your issue choosing you.” In recent times, the alarming disparities in health equality and social justice have outlined America’s shadow. Many of the people residing in this country, whether residents or immigrants, have begun to feel undermined and neglected. This only catalyzes the gap in health equity between those of higher socioeconomic status, different races and cultures, and those who truly do believe in the American dream. While my thoughts here are not meant to be political or divisive, I simply wish to give my opinion on these things that have both enlightened and aggravated me.

No matter the issue that is brought to light, the first step in any pathway of resolution is simple: acknowledge the problem. While those in classes or passionate about these issues understand the implications of the gap in equity, many others don’t. These issues, first and foremost, need to be brought to light in a simple and factual matter. As we have seen recently in many news outlets and developments, the importance of evidence and factual certainties are eroding to those in charge of its change. The data that is recorded and stored needs to be synthesized and presented in a feasible and pragmatic way. Those in the field of public health and medicine have already started this. But more exposure, more understanding, more compassion is needed to change this.

In terms of specific policy, I believe that education and fiscal policy is the best tool to initially combat this lack in equity. As we have seen in class, a higher socioeconomic status is correlated to an increase in health certainty and healthcare. While it is not a guarantee that wealth will provide more resolution, the people more at risk for a health equity loss need resources to provide healthcare and promote well-being. Fiscally, this is one avenue in which policy can be enacted towards. As we have seen, the implementation of the Affordable Health Care act was meant to provide those fiscally and socially challenged with healthcare options. While some may not have agreed at its nuances, its idea and soul is something that is recognized by those across both sides of the isle.  A change in fiscal policy can also lead to an overall growth of society as those with more money, arguably, can provide a pathway for those who need it to stand on their own. The morals of this issue can be debated at an another time but in general, fiscal responsibility is needed to initiate a change.

Education, however, remains the most important aspect of change. Simply put, if one is not informed on the issue, then a judgment cannot be made which is both accurate and reflective of the situation. Disregarding “alternate” ideas and stories, knowledge of the issue and its research is important for everyone to understand to resolve the issue.

Barring any intensive debates and disputes, what do you believe is the best avenue for change? Do you think that it is more important for action to be taken first or knowledge to be presented?

 

Thanks! Have fun discussing!

College has absolutely provided me with new trials and tribulations to develop as a professional and as a human being. I am very grateful that I could attend this university and partake in the activities that I do. Without a doubt, I have grown personally in terms of my time management skills and communication skills. I had to learn how to manage my rigorous academics and extracurricular involvements. While I became involved in some clubs, that is one area of improvement I have for next semester. Certain academic clubs, such as M-Heal and charity organizations such as UNICEF intrigue me enough to continue my involvement for them.  In terms of my priest achievements, I live that I am proud of so far meeting new people and just talking. In high school, I used to be a shy and timid man who would rarely open his mouth. As time progressed, I opened and became who I am today. For me, that ability to communicate and talk is critical and I enjoy it very much. Second semester is a catalyst for more involvement, more studying habits, and developing more relationships with my peers and mentors.

The Affordable Healthcare Act and its Future

The Affordable Healthcare Act and its Future

Healthcare is a staple of human existence. In the United States, healthcare is a vital aspect of society which is reflected by the passage of legislation such as Deciare, Medicaid, and now the ACA. In particular, in the JAMA article written by President Obama himself, the known possible progress about the ACA and healthcare is analyzed. In particular, it is fascinating to read the though statistics as well as analysis that has been collected over these years on healthcare for American citizens. In a generic sense, the uninsured rate has declined vie nearly 43%, now down to 9.1% in 2015 (JAMA). While the specific stats can be discussed, there is no doubt that there has been an increase in the number of insured citizens. Furthermore, what sol surprises me is the “reorientation “of healthcare that is assumed by the by the article, even if 19 states have still not accepted the expansion of Medicaid. Furthermore, what also interest me is the new payment plan orientation, rather than the initial “fee-for-fee “service. The ACA, as indicated by the article, has striven to introduce alternative paying methods for healthcare. I was surprised that the system did not have that before, as federal college loans do. The JAMA article provided many different insights that were very surprising to their specifics and claims.  

Furthermore, the purpose of the ACA is to provide healthcare for US Citizens, a noble purpose. However, there is just cause to say that is implementation and passage were an unfair reflection of the United States legislative system. The Republican Presidential candidate, Donald J Trump, has already voiced his disdain for the Affordable Healthcare Act and would like to replace it with an alternate program. He would also like to fund the states with block grants in order to give them the freedom to choose the Medicaid programs that will serve them better. On the other hand, the Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton’s position on healthcare is clear: she will defend the passage of the ACA and would like to protect its intent. I am worried about both of these candidate’s stances for different reasons. From the perspective of Trump, trying to destroy the Aca and replace it will only waste the time needed to protect American Citizens. As well, with the current political stance, it is possible that the same type of partisan politics, that was accused during the previous administration, can occur. On the democratic side, while I agree to defend and fox the ACA, continuing to support it can lead to the stalemate that has been happening as of recent. This is just my political opinion on the public health policy. On specific healthcare gridlines, it seems to be that both parties agree to lower the costs, introduce more affordable care coverage plans, and help the citizens. The specifics can be different but in a general sense, I abide by their long-term goals for the most part.

I believe that for the healthcare to be fully protective of the American society, Medicaid should be expanded to every state. Much of the uninsured part of the American demographic is the low-income Americans, people why can be covered by the Medicaid expansion. It will take some time to convince the 19 states that have not done so, but it should be essential in my opinion. On another note, another possible improvement could be the direct relationship between the insures ad their customers. Delegating it through business or other entities leads to a middle man that will change the system for its own benefit. The current high premiums and high deductibles can and should be lowered. To do so, it is necessary to remove many of the redundancies inside the system. Healthcare.gov was an opportunity to do so, yet it was not fully pragmatic. IF these two basic things are done, it can become easier to serve all American citizens the healthcare they deserve.