Week 11: Social Determinants of Health

Week 11: Social Determinants of Health

As we learned in class, there are different factors of social determinants that can affect our health in many different ways. Some include education, socioeconomic status, physical environment, personal behaviors, employment, etc. Although some of these factors have not directly influence my health, they have influenced some of my family members. For me, education and socioeconomic status has had both a positive and negative impact on my family.  

            My parents were both first generation college students from their side of the family. They both value education and ingrained the same mindset, or behavior, into me. My parents were able to break away from their family’s cycle and gain a higher education to benefit them in the future. Earning a higher education allowed them to move our family to a more thriving environment. I feel that education and socioeconomic status played a heavy role in my life. My parents are knowledgeable about health and they make sure my sister and I are knowledgeable as well. They make sure we go to the doctor’s for yearly check-up, dentist office, and they make sure they we have a healthy, balanced diet. They made sure we have health insurance.

 I could say that these things are simple, minimal needs, but that would be ungrateful. Most of my uncles, aunts, and cousins do not have the “simple, minimal needs” I have. Their social determinants, specifically education and socioeconomic status, play a negative role in their lives. Some can barely afford health insurance because of their socioeconomic status. The one that can afford health insurance, don’t go to the hospital if necessary because they health literacy or education as a whole. From my point of view, some of my extended family do not go to hospitals because they are intimated by doctors. My grandparents feel uncomfortable without my father, or my sister and I, in the hospital with them because they lack education. I feel that since my immediate family had the opportunity to gain a higher education and move up in socioeconomic status, it has put somewhat of a dent in the relationship between some of our extended family members and my family. Family is family and it shouldn’t negatively impact our relationship; but unfortunately, it does.

3 thoughts on “Week 11: Social Determinants of Health

  1. Social determinants of health are a broad term, one whose specific implementations can affect a plethora of circumstances. They can affect me directly, those whom I love and care for, and others in my near vicinity. In fact, in my circumstance, both my parents are first-generation colleges students who immigrated here for the benefit of their family. In my family, education was always the goal, wither nor not it was financially available at that point. Asa result, I have firmly believed that education can be one of the most influential social determinants of health, as it has the potential to inform, persuade, and pursue development. You bring up a good pint in saying that while we may all be related, each of our social determinants are different. In my family, their primary social determinate is their socioeconomic status. While they are educated, they plainly do not have the financial needs to keep their health in check. In my case, while we may not always have had the most financial means to keep our health a priority, we were educated enough to know that we should make every effort to do so. My mother would always make doctors’ appointments, physicals, and any tether thing that was covered in the insurance policy we were covered under. In a general sense, a plethora of factors affects health determinants. In my case, the priority of education and urn developing socioeconomic status played the most pivotal role.

  2. Nicole I can totally relate to this post. You can definitely see the difference in people when they have been affected by different social determinants. My mother was also a first generation college student. Seeing her mom, dad, and two older twin brothers not pursue a higher education’s hard and therefore when she applied for colleges it really didn’t mean that much to her, because there was not much money or support from her family. She was not guided throughout her process and therefore did not apply to scholarships but because of her education, I am able to live well. She was eventually able to pay off all of her school debt and her education was worth it. On the other hand none of my dad’s family went to college and neither did he. His social determinants totally affected him. His mother had passed away and his father was nit around, so he barely finished high school. My dad had many siblings but only 4 others were in the house. Living conditions were not the best and four boys in their late teens had to survive on their own and make a living for theirselves. Even though my mother did not have anyone pushing her to go to college, she still went to one of the best high schools in her time and had a family at her side. Living conditions and family conditions are often very affective social determinants.

  3. Retype:
    Nicole I can totally relate to this post. You can definitely see the difference in people when they have been affected by different social determinants. My mother was also a first generation college student. Seeing her mom, dad, and two older twin brothers not pursue a higher education deterred her a little from going to college. When she applied for colleges it really didn’t mean that much to her, because there was not much money or support from her family. She was not guided throughout her process and therefore did not apply to scholarships but because of her education she was eventually able to pay off all of her school debt and it was worth it.

    On the other hand none of my dad’s family went to college and neither did he. His social determinants totally affected him. His mother had passed away when he was 16 and his father was not around to support, so he barely finished high school. My dad had many siblings but only 4 were in the house. Living conditions were not the best and five boys in their late teens had to survive on their own and make a living for themselves. Even though my mother did not have anyone pushing her to go to college, she still went to one of the best high schools in her time and had a family at her side. Those two things pushed her to get an education beyond high school. My father was not as fortunate. His mother had passed during his high school years and he had no one to support him. The stress of trying to provide for himself as a teenager deterred him from graduating from high school on time and it was hard for him to continue his education after that.

    I can agree that living conditions and family conditions are often very affective social determinants. This is the sad truth but hopefully people can look beyond their barriers and push forward.

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