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Month: October 2016

Death, Dying, and Being Remembered

Death, Dying, and Being Remembered

Death is inevitable, so after we’re gone what is left? Our legacy. If I were to be gone tomorrow I wouldn’t necessarily want to be remembered by everyone like Micheal Jackson or Elvis Presley. I would want to be remembered by a select few people who really knew and loved me. I would want to be remembered for how hard I tried to include/be kind to everyone, even though I failed at times. I would want to be remembered for my ability to walk into a room and make friends, my skills as a leader, and my happy personality. However, it is not just the typical things I want to be remembered for. I’d also like to be remembered for my quirks. The things that  one would only know if they knew me very well, for example, my LOVE of cats, the fact that I have over 120 tubes of lipstick, and that if I could dress like I was from the 1920’s through 1950’s everyday, I would. If I am fortunate enough to grow old I would also  like to be remembered for the positive things I accomplished throughout my career. The things I did to improve the lives of others. As someone who is considering pursuing a career social work this could very well be a reality. Being remembered for the life I lived as well as the lives I touch is what I hope to be remembered for after I die.

What legacy do you hope to leave behind? Why?

Do you hope to be remembered by many as the rich and famous are, or a select few? Why or why not?

Is there anything very specific you hope to be remembered for? If so what is it? Why?

Is there anything you would want only your family to know after you die?

How does your legacy differ from the one I hope to leave?

 

 

Week 7-LBTQ Health Reform

Week 7-LBTQ Health Reform

Health Disparities are not extremely prevalent to most of us in society.  We take the health care we receive for granted and often disregard the possibility of others being discriminated against.  This was the case for me as I was enlightened this past week.  Never would have I imagined that it was doctors, not the church, that characterized the LGBTQ community and looked down upon them.  As medical professionals I expected exemplary courtesy and respect for individuals of all races, ethnicities, and sexual identities.  It makes me ponder further about the doctor I aspire to be, one inclusive of all people.  Moving forward, I think the best way to reduce such discrimination lies in public awareness and educating individuals.  Speaking from a personal standpoint, I personally didn’t know too much about the LGBTQ community until this lecture.  Only after was I brought to light about all the appalling occurrences that this community goes through on a daily basis.

These biases have permeated for too long and as such need to be addressed immediately.  So, my fellow HSSP’rs, what legislative or social action do you think should be taken to prevent discrimination towards the LGBTQ community and prevent this issue from ever recurring?

Discrimination against LGBTQ

Discrimination against LGBTQ

The things that surprised me most about the discrimination were the lack of action when AIDs was first discovered and the role physicians played in increasing discrimination against LGBTQ people. Its really horrible how many people were allowed to die to this disease due to prejudice against the LGBTQ community. It is also horrible how physicians tried to use science to justify their own prejudice. This shows why it is so important to be aware of unconscious bias, so that we do not end up letting it affect how we treat others.

I think the most important part of trying to reduce discrimination is to get people more familiar with people who aren’t like them, as  this can prevent them from viewing groups different them as an ‘other’ like what happened during the AIDs epidemic. While we still have a long way to go to overcome prejudice we are slowly getting closer and can work together to reach that goal faster.

Discrimination Against LGBTQ+ in Health: How Can We Change This?

Discrimination Against LGBTQ+ in Health: How Can We Change This?

Coming into Thursday’s lecture, I was well aware of most of the discrimination that people in the LGBTQ+ community face in both the health field and in life in general. However, one of the most surprising things I learned was who initially pathologized homosexuality. I quickly assumed that the church/religion would have started this idea, but instead I found that it was actually medical professionals. Because of this, homosexuality was then diagnosed as if it were a disease. From then on, the stigma of anything outside the heteronormative person became evident and that stigma still persists today—through conscious and unconscious biases. And while bias against the LGBTQ+ community is clearly present, it surprised me to learn that bisexuals were more discriminated against in comparison to lesbian or gay people.
Discrimination of LGBTQ+ peole because of their sexual or gender orientation is not new to me, but it’s always shocking in the way that people would be discriminated against for something so seemingly trivial. While some biases against this community may be unconscious, this problem must still be addressed. I think the first step to confront this problem is to be informed of gender and sexual orientation and expression. I think by learning more about the different ways people can express themselves made it easier to be more understanding of others in the LGBTQ+ community. Being more informed about others and consciously acknowledging our biases against this and other communities would be a big step in the right direction to ending discrimination in the health field. What else do you think can be done to counter discrimination and bias against LGBTQ+ individuals in the health field?

LGBTQ – Thinking Progressively

LGBTQ – Thinking Progressively

Thursday’s LGBTQ lecture, in my mind, was eye-opening and intriguing.  I always enjoy learning things which I have rarely been exposed to.  In high school, the LGBTQ community was never talked about, unless it was from a student’s insensitive or ignorant mouth.  Honestly, I was not completely shocked as to some of the staggering statistics, such as the trans-gender suicide attempt rate is at nearly 40% or that less than 10% of the U.S identifies with the LGBTQ community.

In contrast, I found the information on “therapies” to rid people of homosexuality or bisexuality shocking.  I was unaware of the fact that methods of electrocuting people and giving them substances to vomit uncontrollably were enforced in such “therapies”.  It is truly mind-blowing as to some of the things the human race has done in attempts to “better” humanity.  It seems as if we have already made great progress.   The fact that I am learning this information during an LGBTQ health lecture speaks for itself.

Furthermore, the information Adam presented regarding HIV/AIDS caught my attention.  The immense unawareness for people during this epidemic regarding PrEP and Truvada was tragic.  The classification of HIV/AIDS as an “other” illness by many professionals is astonishing.

I find it very interesting to think about how vastly different people are on a minority level.  As we briefly discussed Thursday, the spectrum ranges from black, homosexual women, to white, heterosexual men.  Unfortunately, those two people will live very different lives.  Sadly, it should not be that way.

Thinking positively, I believe it is safe to say that we as a people have come a long way.  In just the past 50 years, as Adam explained, the LGBTQ community experienced disparities and travesties.  Not to say that the LGBTQ community has it easy these days, but that there is hope to grab hold onto.  On June 26, 2015, the U.S Supreme Court ruled that gay marriage is a right protected by the US Constitution in all 50 states.  If that’s not progress, then I don’t know what is.

Critically thinking, what do y’all, my fellow HSSPers, believe is the best way to continue this progress and hopefully end health disparities and prejudices within the LGBTQ community?

 

-Grant Floto

LBGTQ Health Care

LBGTQ Health Care

Thursday’s lecture about health disparities of LBGTQ people was shocking to me. I never knew that after all of these years LBGTQ are still being mistreated, especially by doctors and other medical staff who are supposed to be helping everyone.

What surprised me the most was the HIV/AIDS epidemic and how nobody took action. The entire outbreak could have been minimized if HIV was not written off as the “gay disease.” The government and healthcare professionals didn’t take action because they figured the disease wouldn’t affect them. Their lack of action and sympathy led to an entire epidemic that killed thousands of people.

It also surprised me that people don’t know about the preventative HIV drug that is on the market. Especially after the deadliness of the original epidemic, you would assume everyone should know how to avoid a similar situation. Insurance companies and the drug company cover most of the cost of the drug, yet not that many people are using it. Or the people who are using the drug are at the lowest risk of actually getting HIV. There is a lack of awareness for such a useful drug that could save thousands of lives.

The United States is supposed to be an accepting place where everyone has the opportunity for a better life. But as a country we have a history of forgetting about and mistreating minority populations. My question is what steps do we need to take in order to fix this problem and give equal treatment to everyone?

LGBTQ Health Disparities and Changes

LGBTQ Health Disparities and Changes

Thursday’s lecture was incredibly insightful, as I learned statistics and facts about the LGBTQ community that I was previously unfamiliar with; however, finding out about how homosexuality was once categorized by the DSM as a disorder was shocking. Though I was aware that homosexuality was seen as something to be “cured of” in the past, I did not realize that it was given a formal status as a disorder by the American Psychiatric Association. The fact that a differing sexual orientation was once believed to be a mental disorder provides insight as to why there are health disparities in the LGBTQ community. Such a longstanding stigma has greatly impacted our society and how we view those who are a part of the LGBTQ community.

The biases that have been put in place due to historical circumstances raises questions as to how we can overcome these obstacles and what can be done to equalize healthcare across different populations. The LGBTQ community only makes up a fraction of the population, but the misdiagnoses and discrimination that are prevalent in treating patients from the LGBTQ community are incredibly high. Though it is 2016, and several steps have been taken towards reducing discrimination and biases, our healthcare system has a long way to go. Many milestones have been reached, but it is important that we continue to work at this.

LGBTQ Health Disparities

LGBTQ Health Disparities

There was much that I learned from the lecture on Thursday that was very surprising to me. I had no idea how much of a disparity there is between LGBTQ individuals and non LGBTQ patients. I was not aware that LGBTQ patients were treated poorly in healthcare. For example, bisexuals are treated worse than gays and lesbians. This shouldn’t happen in healthcare because the job of a doctor is to treat their patients no matter what. It is extremely unfair to treat LGBTQ individuals differently just because of their sexuality. Doctors who refuse to treat LGBTQ individuals are not doing their duties properly.

I also found it interesting that a black trans man was denied treatment for severe vaginal bleeding. Doctors were biased against this individual because of his life choices and thought that he just wanted money for a transition surgery. It turned out that this patient had cancer and it probably could have been stopped sooner if the doctors hadn’t refuse to treat this patient.

Discrimination based on sexuality and gender identity should not be something that prevents individuals form receiving quality health care. So my question is, what can be done to combat this health disparity?

Health Disparities in the LGBTQ Community

Health Disparities in the LGBTQ Community

Although there are many groups who suffer from health disparities, the LGBTQ community is one that suffers a great deal in regards to health care and biases. As the article we read proved, there are inequalities in healthcare, and while they may be unintended society, especially health care providers needs to be aware of such discrimination and work together to end it.

One thing that stuck out to me in lecture was that is there is a great bias against bisexuals then people who identify themselves as lesbian or gay. Until very recently, being bisexual was thought to be a made up identify and as a result this specific community suffered more so than others. One example showing how bisexuals are not only treated differently from the straight community but also from those of gay or lesbian identities was that  bisexuals are said to get worse treatment in areas specific to mental health and well being; some sources even say that bisexuals fall victim to drug abuse than to others of the LGBTQ community. Many health disparities such as this stem from unconscious bias towards out groups, and since the LBGTQ community is only 2-10% of the population they are especially at risk of health disparities. One way to fix this is to break the social stigma of being gay, bisexual, gender fluid, queer, or anything.

One negative thing I hear quite often is that people choose to be in this group for attention. This creates huge judgments and inequalities and is frankly not true. If more people were to understand the genetic background of being part of the LGBTQ community I believe there would be less disparities.

So, my question to you as future health providers is what do you think is the best way to break the stigma against the LGBTQ community and decrease health disparities?

 

LGBTQ Health Disparities and What Needs To Change

LGBTQ Health Disparities and What Needs To Change

I learned many new things from Thursday’s lecture, but the most surprising thing I learned was about how unjustly LBGTQ individuals were treated in hospitals and medical practices.  This general theme also relates back to the lecture pre-reading. I am mostly referring to the NPR article “In The Hospital, There’s No Such Thing As A Lesbian Knee.”  In the article, there are many stories of LGBTQ people who faced injustice and difficulties when attempting to get help from medical institutions.  A story which hit me the hardest was an anecdote about how a lesbian woman wasn’t granted permission to enter her dying partner’s hospital room.  Stories like this and also ones about how LGBTQ people are not always granted the organs they need for survival because of their lifestyle or about how they are misdiagnosed at a higher rate than non-LGBTQ people are a definite cause for concern.

I believe there are currently so many problems in the LGBTQ healthcare field because of the way some people still view LGBTQ people in our society.  Not everyone is educated on what being a part of the LGBTQ community means, and unfortunately, this can influence medical professionals as well as everyone else.  I believe and hope this problem is getting better, as new doctors take over for older ones the mindset towards LGBTQ people will become more accepting and fair. My question to pose is this: what additional reasons do you believe are part of why LGBTQ individuals are sometimes mistreated now, and what can we do to change this in the future?